New to Lumiere Installation LED

35. LINES

Pekka Niittyvirta & Timo Aho (Finland)

Location: Fulling Mill stretch of River bank

A vivid white line highlights the catastrophic impact of rising sea levels

Lines – which cuts across the Fulling Mill stretch of the river bank below the West Front of the Cathedral –  aims to serve as a visual warning of rising water levels if the earth continues to warm. Inspired by the connection and co-existence between contemporary society, urban development and oceans, the artwork  gives us an insight into a future in which most glaciers have melted. 

Initially exploring the physical positions of seaside communities and their futures, this project has developed into an exploration of the causality of climate change. By making abstract facts inescapably tangible, Niittyvirta and Aho hope that this artwork has the potential to turn climate knowledge into climate action in a way that news reports and images can’t.

 

About Pekka Niittyvirta & Timo Aho

Pekka Niittyvirta’s (b. 1974, Helsinki) work often deals with consequences of human actions, whether they are related to the society, technology, environment or the financial market. He mostly uses photography and video as a material in various ways to depict a situation or phenomena.

Niittyvirta’s works do not necessarily rely on traditional imaging processes alone, incorporating various digital, biological and chemical processes, they address such issues as the problems of technology and information society. Niittyvirta lives and works in Helsinki. 

niittyvirta.com 

Timo Aho (b. 1980, Finland) works with site-specific installation, sculpture and intervention. In his work, he uses a wide range of materials and media, often including ephemeral elements such as light and air. His artistic practice investigates our environment through societal structures and belief systems. Examining the fine line between reality and fiction, Aho disentangles these topics with subtle gestures.

timoaho.org

The installation explores the catastrophic impact of our relationship with nature and its long-term effects. Art has the potential to convey scientific data, complex ideas and concepts, in a powerful way that words or graphs fall short of. Hopefully, through this work, people can better visualise and relate to [the] reality.

Pekka Niittyvirta & Timo Aho

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